AP LANGUAGE Study Guide (2012-13 Ms. Rose)

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Endearing
  • ...the element of defiant self-nurturance that makes the habit so endearing to its victims...(Ehrenreich 158).
  • Making dear or liked
  • Adjective
  • Appealing; lovable
liniment

-liquid to the skin for sprains or bruises (soothing).

-"He unrolled his bindle and put things on the shelf his razor and bar of soap, his comb and bottle of pills, his liniment and leather wristband" (Steinbeck 19).

Liniment
  • (n.) a liquid for rubbing on or applying to the skin, as for sprains or bruises, usually soothing or counterirritating.
  • In one han he held a bottle of liniment, and with the other he rubbed his spine (Steinbeck 67).
  • Syn. emollient, medicine, ointment.
liniment
  • "He unrolled his bindle and put things on the shelf, his razor and bar of soap, his comb and bottle of pills, his liniment and leather wristband" (Steinbeck 19).
  • liquid used to ease pain
  • noun
  • Ointment, lotion
Burlap
A type of cloth
Rheumatism
Medical disorder affecting the joints
Rheumatism
  • (n.) any disorder of the extremities or back, characterized by pain and stiffness.
  • 'He's all stiff with rheumatism' (Steinbeck 44).
  • No synonymns.
Rheumatism
  1. any disorder of the extremities or back, characterized by pain and stiffness.
  2. Noun
  3. Synoyms: Unavailable
Mottled
Marked with spots of color
Test card
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test
(n). the means by which the presence, quality, or genuineness of anything is determined.
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Works.
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affluence 
  • "... population of competitors rather than the affluence of the dumpsters that most affects the feasibility of survival by scavenging" (Eighner 7).
  • Affluence: abundance of money, property, and other material goods; riches; wealth. n.
  • luxury, abundance
intrinsic
  • "... things which never have much intrinsic value but are interesting" (Eighner 7).
  • Intrinsic: belonging to a thing by its very nature. adj.
  • basic, inborn
Intrinsic
  • a. "Dumpsters are full of things of some potential value to someone and also of things which never have much "intrinsic" value but are interesting" (Eighner 7).
  • b. belonging to a thing by its very nature
  • c. (adj.)
  • d. fundamental; innate
Intrinsic
  • "Dumpsters are full of things of some potential value to someone and also of things which never have much intrinsic value but are interesting" [Eighner 7].
  • Adj. belonging to a thing by its very nature
  • Native, innate
intrinsic
  • Dumpsters are  full of things of some potential value  to someone and also of things which never have much intrinsic value but are interesting (Eighner 2).
  • (adj.)- belonging to a thing by its very nature
  • Synonyms- native or real
Intrinsic
  • "Dumpsters are full of things of some potential value to someone and also of things which never have much intrinsic value but are interesting" (Eighner 7).
  • Adj.
  • Belonging to a thing by its very nature
  • innate, inhering
intrinsic
  • "Dumpsters are full of things of some potential value to someone and also og things which never hae much intrinsic value but are interesting" (Eighner).
  • (ADJ) belonging to someone or something by its very nature
  • Synonyms: essential, inherent
image spurious for term side of card
"Misrepresentative graphs and drawings ------- the real data and encourage readers to accept ------- arguments... (B) distort . . spurious" (The Official SAT Study Guide 45)..
(adj.) Not being what it purports to be; false or fake.
synonyms: false, sham

image eclectic for term side of card
"Since many teachers today draw on material from a variety of sources, disciplines, and ideologies for their lessons, their approach could best be called -------... (A) eclectic" (The Official SAT Study Guide 46).
(adj.) Deriving ideas, style, or taste from a broad and diverse range of sources.
synonyms: broad, diverse, multifarious
image leery for term side of card
"Unprecedented turmoil in the usually thriving nation has made the formerly ------- investors leery of any further involvement" (The Official SAT Study Guide 46).
(adj.) Cautious or wary due to realistic suspicions.
synonyms: suspicious, canny
image reticent for term side of card
"Unprecedented turmoil in the usually thriving nation has made the formerly ------- investors leery of any further involvement... (D) reticent" (The Official SAT Study Guide 46).
(adj.) Not revealing one's thoughts or feelings readily.
synonyms: reserved, taciturn
image sanguine for term side of card
"Unprecedented turmoil in the usually thriving nation has made the formerly ------- investors leery of any further involvement... (E) sanguine" (The Official SAT Study Guide 46).
(adj.) cheerfully optimistic, hopeful, or confident.
synonyms: confident, buoyant
Dyslogistic
expressing disapproval; "dyslogistic terms like `nitwit' and `scalawag'"
image cardimage_3351082_ for term side of card
- There is a path through the willows and among the sycamores.... (Steinbeck 1)
- Sycamores are a specific type of tree located in the Americas southern region
- tree, bark
Lumbered
- Lennie lumbered to his feet... (Steinbeck 9)
- move in a slow, heavy, awkward way
- slow, dragged
Lumbered
  • "Lennie lumbered to his feet and disappeared in the brush" (Steinbeck 8).
  • (v.)- to move heavily, clumsily
  • Synonyms: plod or barge

Compassion

  • On Compassion
  • A feeling of deep sympathy and sorrow for another who is stricken by misfortune, accompanied by a strong desire to alleviate the suffering.
  • Noun
  • benevolence and charity

Stave

  • "Twice when I have stopped here to stave hunger or to stay the cold, twice as I have sat and read and felt the warm rush of hot coffee and milk, an old man has wandered in and stood inside the enterance." (Ascher 36)
  • prevent
  • Verb
  • avoid and obviate

Electorate

  • "And so, the troublesome presence is removed from the awareness of the electoate."(Ascher 37)
  • The body of people entitled to vote in an election
  • Noun
  • league and junta

Proletarian

  • "I could drift along like this, in some dreamy proletarien idyll, except for two things."(Ehrenreich 151)
  • Of or relating to the protariat (protariat- the class of industrial wage earners who must earn their wage by selling their labor)
  • Noun
  • lower class and bourgeoisie
Surpluses 
  • "Home leftovers, as opposed to surpluses from restaurants, are very often bad" (Eighner 4).
  • Used as reference to the extra food that restaurants often throw out.
  • Noun
  • Oversupply, surfeit
Disparage
  • "Those who disparage his profession are the fools, not he" (Eighner 5).
  • Those who criticize don't truly grasp the concept of Dumpster Diving.
  • Verb
  • Criticize, Vilify
Disparage
  • Those who disparage his profession are the fools, not he (Eighner 7).
  • (v.) Regard or represent as being of little worth.
  • Belittle, Decry
disparage
(v.) to depreciate; to belittle.
"Those who disparage his profession are the fools, not he." (Eighner 7)
Disparage
  • "Those who disparage his profession are the fools, not her." (Eighner 7).
  • To speak negatively
disparage
  • "Those who disparage his profession are the fools." (Eighner 7)
  • criticize; detract from
  • verb
  • belittle, disdain
Vanities
  • "Silly vanities also come to rest in the dumpsters" (Eighner 7).
  • Referring to the way he believes that the girls that throw out embroidery kits are conceited and try to impress everyone, including themselves.
  • Noun
  • Conceit, Narcissism
Go raiders
Doe
image abundance for term side of card
  • "Persons in poverty are rising to opulence, and persons of wealth are sinking to poverty." (dictionary.com)
  • (N) Wealth, riches, and affluence.
  • Abundant and Ample
image ostentatious for term side of card
  • "The city lacks ostentatious palaces, temples, or monuments." (Dictionary.com)
  • (Adj) characterized by or given to pretentious or conspicuousshow in an attempt to impress others
  • Pretentiousness and Grandiose
image ogu0004l for term side of card
  • "The staff is charming and superb, being attentive without being obsequious." (Dictionary.com)
  • (adj) characterized by or showing servile complaisance or deference.
  • Submissive and Sycophantic
image changeable-lizard--calotes-versicolor for term side of card
  • "Together, the steady dandelions and the mercurial orchids offer anadaptive flexibility that neither can provide alone." (Dictionary.com)
  • (adj) Changeable
  • Inconstant and Indecisive
image 6a00e54fe4158b8833011571ebb197970b-320wi for term side of card
  • "First, it is necessary to defuse the obvious acrimony between counsel." (Dictionary.com)
  • (n) Sharpness or bitterness of speech or temper.
  • Animosity and Asperity
adversity
  • It must be learned, and it is learned by having adversity at our windows, coming through the gates of our yards, the walls of our towns, adversity that becomes so familiar that we begin to identify and empathize with it.
  • poor, unfortunate situation
  • noun
  • catastrophe, affliction
adversity
  • "It must be learned, and it is learned by having adversity at our windows, coming through the gates of our yards, the walls of our towns, adversity that becomes so familiar that we begin to identify and empathize with it" (Ascher 37).
  • (n). a condition marked by misfortune, calamity, or distress
  • synonyms: trouble, affliction
trope
  • Or just to show the all purpose usefulness of this trope, here's Republican Congressman David Rivera being questioned about an investigation into his campaign finances (This American Life 3).
  • expression by comparison
  • noun
  • analogy, allegory
Trope
  • "Or just to show the all-purpose, usefulness of his trope..." (Glass).
  • A phrase, sentence, or verse that consists in the use of words in other than their literal sense
  • Noun
  • Synonyms: Allegory, alliteration
Trope
  • a figure of language that produces an indirect meaning (metaphor, simile)
  • "...the all purpose usefulness of this trope..." (Glass)
  • simile,
collegial

  • After a few hours, I was thinking this conference is like a convention of incredibly collegial pickpockets (This American Life 18).
  • cooperative
  • adjective
  • shared, concerted
boon
(n.) something to be thankful for; blessing; benefit.

synonyms: grant, help

"Some divers would have considered this a boon, but being suddenly and thoroughly intoxicated in a public place in the early afternoon is not my idea of a good time" (Eighner 6).
Boon
  • a. "Some divers would have considered this a "boon", but being suddenly and thoroughly intoxicated in a public place in the early afternoon is not my idea of a good time" (Eighner 6).
  • b. something to be thankful for; blessing; benefit
  • c. (n.)
  • d. advantage; largess 
Boon
-"some divers would consider this a boon" (Eighner 6)
-a blessing
-noun
-godsend, benevolence
Boon
  • Benefit
  • "Some divers would have considered this a boon..." (Eighner 6).
  • blessing, miracle
gaudy 
(adj.) brilliantly or excessively showy.

synonyms: blatant, flashy

"Anyway, I find my desire to grab for the gaudy bauble has been largely satisfied" (Eighner 8).
Gaudy
  • Anyway, I find my desire to grab for the gaudy bauble has been largely sated (Eighner 8).
  • Excessively showy (used especially of clothes)
  • Adjective
  • Flasy, showy
gaudy

  a. "Anyway, I find my desire to grab for the gaudy bauble has been largely sated" (Eighner 8).

  b. marked by extravagance or sometimes tasteless showiness

  c. adjective

  d. synonyms: flamboyant, ostentatious

Gaudy


Quote: “…to grab for the gaudy bauble…” (Eighner 8).

Definition: Brilliantly or excessively showy

Part of Speech: Adjective

Synonym: Tawdry, Loud, Conspicuous, Obvious

Gaudy
  • "Anyway, I find my desire to grab for the gaudy bauble has been largely sated"(Eighner 3).
  • cheaply showy in a tasteless way
  • adjective
  • flashy, splendiferous
Gaudy
  • "Anyway, I find my desire to grab for the gaudy bauble has been largely sated." (Eighner, 3).
  • Brilliantly or excessively showy.
  • Adjective
  • Flashy, Garish
Gaudy
  • "Once a day a cheap, gaudy packet arrived upward from St. Louis..." (Twain)
  • Brilliantly or excessively showy
  • Adjective
  • Flashy, Brazen
Abase
  • "After being overthrown and abased, the deposed leader offered to bow down to his conqueror."
  • V. to humiliate, degrade
  • Debauch, lessen
Abase
  • "After being overthrown and abased, the deposed leader offered to bow down to his conqueror."
  • verb
  • to humiliate, to degrade
  • belittle, demean
Abasement
  • SAT prep
  • to reduce or lower, as in rank, office, reputation, or estimation; humble; degrade.
  • verb
  • ignominy, humilation, degradation
Ameliorate
  • "The tense situation was ameliorated when Sam proposed a solution everyone could agree upon."
  • V. To improve.
  • Improve. Enhance.
Ameliorate
  • "They did not record using an incline in this study, but using one might ameliorate the issues you raise" (Dictionary.com, LLC).
  • Definition: (verb) to improve; to make something better or become better.
  • Synonyms:  amend, better, improve
ameliorate
  • To improve or make better.
  • "Ofcourse, that doesn't ameliorate the damage." (Prager 354
  • verb
  • improve, reform
Ameliorate

to make or become better, more bearable, or more satisfactory; improve; meliorate.

verb

synonyms: improve and amend

Ameliorate
a) "Of course that doesn't ameliorate the damage" (Prager 334).
b) to improve,make better,correct a flaw or shortcoming
c) Verb
d) Alleviate, amend

ameliorate
  • "Of course, that doesn't ameliorate the damage" (Prager 354).
  • (V) to improve or make better
  • Synonyms: enhance, advance
Ameliorate
  • "Of course, that doesn't ameliorate the damage." (Prager 354).
  • To make or become bearable
  • Verb
  • Alleviate/mitigate

ameliorate 
to make something bad better, or to improve.
  • verb
  • synonyms :improve,better, mend
  • "Of course, that doesn't ameliorate the damage"(Prager 354).
Ameliorate
  • "Of course, that doesn't ameliorate the damage" (Prager 1).
  • To make better or more tolerable
  • Verb
  • Amend, Better
Ameliorate
  • (v.)- to improve or make better
  • "Of course, that doesn't ameliorate the damage" (Prager 354).
  • Synonyms: meliorate or improve
ameliorate
  • to make better or more tolerable
  • "Of course, that doesn't ameliorate the damage" (Prager 354).
  • Synonyms: amend, improve
Ameliorate
  • to make or become better or more bearable
  • "Of course, that doesn't ameliorate the damage" (Prager).
  • verb
  • aid, assist
Ameliorate
  • "Of course, that doesn't ameliorate the damage" (Prager 354).
  • To make or become better.
  • Verb
  • improve, amend, upgrade, meliorate
Ameliorate
  • (v.) to make or become better
  • "Of course, that doesn't ameliorate the damage" (Prager 354)
  • to amend or improve
ameliorate 
to make a bad situation better

Ameliorate
  • a. "Of course, that doesn't "ameliorate" the damage" (Pager 354).
  • b. to make better; improve
  • c. (v.)
  • d. amend; mitigate
Ameliorate
  • "Of course, that doesn't ameliorate the damage" (Prager, par 3).
  • to make something better
  • verb
  • alleviate, mitigate
Ameliorate
  • Definition: To make (something bad or unsatisfactory) better.
  • (v.)
  • "Of course, that doesn't ameliorate the damage" (Prager).
  • Synonyms: Improve, Mend
Conciliatory
  • "I took Amanda's invitation to dinner as a very conciliatory gesture."
  • Adj. Friendly/agreeable.
  • Appeasing. Placatory.
Duplicity
  • "His duplicity involved convincing his employees to let him lower their salaries and increase their stock options, and then to steal the money he saved and run the company into the ground."
  • N. Crafty dishonesty.
  • Deceitfulness. Dissemble.
duplicity
  • SAT word
  • seditious action
  • noun
  • deceit, guile
duplicity

a. The life of an undercover detective is filled with necessary duplicity.

b. deceptive thought, speech, or action

c. noun

d. deceit, dishonesty

Duplicity
n.) Deceptive thought, speech or action.
The life of an undercover detective is filled with necessary duplicity.
Emote
  • "The director told the actor he had to emote, or else the audience would have no idea what his character is going through."
  • V. to dramatically express emotion.
  • Dramatize. Personate.
Forlorn
  • "Even though i had the flu, my family decided to go skiing for the weekend and leave me home, feeling feverish and forlorn."
  • Adj. Lonely, abandoned, hopeless
  • Melancholic. Miserable.
Iniquity
  • '"Your iniquity," said the priest to the practical jokester, "will be forgiven."'
  • N. Wickedness or sin.
  • Corruption. Debauchery.
Negligent
  • " Jessie's grandfather called me a negligent fool after i left the door to his apartment unlocked even though there had been a recent string of robberies."
  • Adj. Habitually careless, neglectful]
  • Remiss. Careless.
Neglige
  • n. informal attire
  • Madame Ratignolle looked more beautiful than ever there at home, in a neglige which left her arms almost wholly bare and exposed the rich, melting curves of her white throat (Chopin 55).
  • Synonyms: Informal attire, causal wear
Refute
  • "Maria refuted the president's argument as she yelled and gesticulated at the TV."
  • V. To prove wrong.
  • Contradict. Gainsay.
Refutation
  • refutatio
  • Achieved by including logical appeal, emotional appeal, ethical appeal, wit, etc. Presents the counterargument.
Refutation
-Refutation
Demonstration or establishment of the falsity of an argument by a rebuttal.
Refutation
Can be achieved in a variety of ways, including logical appeal, emotional appeal, ethical appeal, wit, etc. It should be noted that at times it will be appropriate to present a refutation before one's confirmation. The refutation is also called the counterargument.
Refutation
Also known as counterarguement, and the arguement can include logical, emotional and ethical appeals. The refutation should come before Confirmation. (Refutatio)
Refutation
  • refutatio
  • refutation can be achieved in a variety of ways, including logical appeal, emotional appeal, ethical appeal, wit, etc.
  • Should be noted that at times it will be appropriate to present a refutation before one's confirmation.
  • For example, if an opposing speaker is well received, it will be valuable to refute his arguments before offering one's own.
  • otherwise known as counterargument
Refutation
Called the counterargument, addresses a concern of an opposing viewpoint. 
Trite
  • " Keith thought of himself as being very knowledgeable, but everyone else thought he was trite because his observations about the world were always the same as David Letterman's."
  • Adj. Not original, overused\
  • Stereotyped. Banal.
Begrudge
  • a. "I do not "begrudge" them the cans, but can scroungers tend to tear up the Dumpsters, mixing the contents and littering the area" (Eighner 7).
  • b. to be reluctant to give, grant, or allow
  • c. (v.)
  • d. pinch; covet
Begrudge
  • "I do not begrudge them the cans, but can scroungers tend to tear up the Dumpsters..." (Eighner, 2).
  • To envy or resent the pleasure or good fortune of someone.
  • Verb
  • Envy, Covet

Maliciously
  • I have heard of people maliciously contaminating discarded food and even handouts, but mostly I have jeard of this from people with vivid imaginations.. (Eighner 6).
  • With malice. Malice: feeling a need to see others suffer.
  • Adverb
  • Spite, malevolence.
maliciously
  • " I have heard of people maliciously contaminating food and even handouts, but mostly I have heard of this from people with vivid imagination who have had no experience with the dumpsters themselves."(Eighner 6).
  • noun/ motivated by wrongful, vicious, or mischievous purposes.
  • crookedly/ basely
Maliciously

"I have heard of people maliciously contaminating discarded food and even handouts, but mostly I have mostly heard this from people with vivid imaginations who have no experience with dumpsters themselves" ( Eighner).
  • To cause harm
  • Noun
  • crookly, spite
Malicious
  • "He walked between them, whether with malicious or mischievous was not wholly clear..." (Chopin 46).
  • Adj. Hvaing or showing desire to cause harm to someone.
  • Vicious. Malevolent.
frankness
  • "I like the frankness of the word"(Eighner 6).
  • Out spoken or blunt
  • adj
  • candor/ honesty
Frankness
  • "I like the frankness of the word 'scavenging'" (Eighner 6).
  • Truth; openess
Frankness
-"I like the frankness of the word scavenging" (Eighner 6)
-straightforward in attitude and speech
-adj.
-honest, candor
gingham

  a. "She wore thick bull's-eye glasses and she wore a huge gingham apron with pockets, and she was starched and clean" (Steinbeck 100-101).

  b. a clothing fabric usually of yarn-dyed cotton

  c. noun

  d. synonyms: fabric, velvet

sporadic

  a. "While my dog Lizbeth and I were still living in the house on Avenue B in Austin, as my savings ran out, I put almost all my sporadic income into rent" (Eighner 6).

  b. occurring occasionally, singly, or in irregular or random instances

  c. adjective

  d. synonyms: erratic, spasmodic

sporadic
  • I put almost all my sporadic income into rent (Eighner 6)
  • (adj). appearing or happening at irregular intervals in time
  • synonyms: intermittent, spasmodic
Abhor
  1. to regard with horror or loathing; to hate deeply
  2. Verb
  3. Despise, execrate, abominate
Abhor
  • (v.) to regard with extreme repugnance
  • We believe we know that Americans abhor extremes and mistrust ideology.
  • Hate, Loathe
Abhor
  • SAT prep
  • to regard with horror or loathing, detest utterly
  • verb
  • abominate, scorn, detest
Abhors
  1. to regard with extreme repugnance or aversion; detest utterly; loathe; abominate.
  2. Verb
  3. Synonyms: hate, scorn, abominate
abhors
Def: Regard with disgust and hatred.
  • Verb
  • Synonyms: loathe, despise
  • Example:"The God that holds you over the pit of hell, much as one holds a spider, or some loathsome insect over the fire, abhors you, and is dreadfully provoked"(Johnathan Edwards).
image bigot.jpg for term side of card
  1. person intolerant of any creed, race, religion or political view that is different from theirs
  2. Noun
  3. Dogmatizer, partisan, sectarian
image enfranchise.jpg for term side of card
  1. admit to the rights of citizenship (especially the right to vote); CF. franchise
  2. Verb
  3. Emancipate, unfetter, liberate
Noxious
  1. physically harmful or destructive to living beings
  2. Adjective
  3. Disagreeable, obnoxious, pernicious
Noxious
harmful; poisonous; lethal

Example: The noxious substance had a bright yellow warning label to ensure nobody would eat it.
image remuneration for term side of card
  1. something that remunerates; reward;pays
  2. Noun
  3. Compensation, remittance, disbursement
Talisman
  1. an object that serves as a charm or is believed to confer magical powers, an amulet, fetish
  2. Noun
  3. Amulet, periapt, phylactery, mojo

Compére
  • Just then, the compére got up on the stage and picked up the microphone. "Good evening, ladies and gentlemen…"
  • n. Master of ceremonies
  • Host, adviser
Mote
  • A tiny mote of dust is truly a cosmos unto itself, that much we do now know.
  • n. A tiny speck
  • Dust, iota
Paronymous
  • This in itself is a significant achievement in a language so flowery and paronymous to the extent that exaggeration, especially at that time of its literary history, is widely considered to be one of its inherent characteristics.
  • adj. Wise
  • Educated, wisdom
Hypethral
  • Follow the gallery around for about a thousand paces until you come to the hypethral.
  • adj. A building, wholly or partly open to the sky.
  • No Synonyms or antonyms.
flophouse
n. a cheap, run-down hotel or rooming house.
"Gail is sharing a room in a well-known downtown flophouse for $250 a week." (Ehrenreich 154)
synonyms: fleabag, fleatrap
abut
  • This piece of land abuts on astreet.
  • To touch at the end or boundary line.
  • V.
  • contour, decorate
animadversion

  • It would be the disciplinarian's job to make animadversions on someone's conduct.
  • The utterance of criticism or censure.
  • N
  • criticism,denunciation
contumacious
  • the wrongdoer can be separately indicted for his contumacious acts.
  • stubbornly perverse or rebellious; willfully and obstinatelydisobedient.
  • adj
  • inflexible,insubordinate
dissipate
  • "At this stage, dumpster shyness begins to dissapear." (Eighner 7)
  • dissapear
  • verb
  • vanish, dissapear
Dissipate
  • "At this stage, Dumpster shyness begins to dissipate," (Eighner par. 38).
  • To scatter in various directions
cynosure
  • her cynosure  as an artist is a disciplined evacuation of psychicdistance between her subjects and the viewer.
  • That to which general interest or attention is directed.
  • N
  • notable,personage
superfluous
  • He may have felt any extra knowledge was superfluous .
  • Being more than is needed.
  • adj
  • pleonastic,profuse
Superfluous
  • "These I think it not superfluous to examine, since I know not what lessons I could teach a new Prince, more useful than the example of his actions" (Machiavelli 16).
  • Unnecessary or needless
  • Adjective
  • Excessive, Profuse
superfluous

A. "...and our best virtue has for its occasion a superfluous and evitable wretchedness"  (Thoreau).

B. exceeding what is necessary

C. Adj.

D. Unnecessary, odious

Superfluous
  • "...while the only new question which it puts is the hard but superluous one, how to spend it" (Thoreau 16).
  • Unnecssary, Extra
  • Adjective
  • In excess, superabundant, unessential
Superfluous
  • "...while the onlynew question which it puts is the hard but superfluous one, how to spendit"(Thoreau 16).
  • Extra
  • Ajective
  • Redundant; Unnecessary
Superfluous
  • (adj). being more than is sufficient or required
  • It puts to rest many questions which he would otherwise be taxes to answer; while the only new question which it puts is the hard but superfluous one, how to spend it (Thoreau 16).
  • synonyms: excessive; abounding
superfluous
  • "...while the only new question which it puts is the but superfluous one, how to spend it" (Thoreau 16).
  • unnecessary because of redundancy
  • adjective
  • expendable, lavish
superfluous
  • adj.
  • exceeding what is sufficient or necessary
  • superfluous to mentionit, but don't go swimming if you've been drinking alcohol.
image portrait_reclusive for term side of card
  • Withdrawn from society; seeking solitude
  • Red wolves are shy and reclusive, hunting mostly at night, avoidingcontact with humans.
image poison for term side of card
  • Harmful to living things
  • Doctors might then better understand how to prevent such harm and howto treat patients exposed to deleterious chemicals.
image rummagec for term side of card

  • But for now, in this last gasp of autumn warmth, he is still. Hiseyes fix on the baby. The mother removes her purse from hershoulder and rummages through its contents.... (Ascher par 4)
  • to search thoroughly or actively through (a place, recetacle, etc.) especially by moving around, turning over, or looking through contents
  • Verb
  • Delve, search, look through

image compassion for term side of card

  • Was it fear or compassion that motivated the gift..(Ascher par 6)
  • sympathy for another's suffering; pity
  • Noun
  • loving, caring, helping

image biblica for term side of card

  • ...rights of these people who live in our parks and doorways arebeing violated by involuntary hospitalization... (Ascher 10)
  • to place in a hospital for medical care or observation
  • Noun
  • To be a vegetable, injured

Candying
  • "Candying after all is one method of food preservation because pathogens do not like very [sweet] substances" [Eighner 6].
  • V. Preserve (fruit) by coating and impregnating it with a sugar syrup
  • Honeyed, Ingratiating
image yaprak for term side of card

  • Raw humanity offends our sensibilities. (Ashcer 11)
  • The fact or condition of being human; human nature.
  • Verb (in that context)
  • Love, compassion, earthly

Sensibilities
  • "Raw humanity offends our sensibilities"[Ascher 37].
  • n. plu.  mental susceptibility or responsiveness; quickness and acuteness of apprehension or feeling.
  • susceptibility, sensitivity
Phonograph
  • "'I've knew people that if they got a rag rug on the floor an' a Kewpie doll lamp on the phonograph..." [Steinbeck 52]
  • n.  any sound-reproducing machine using records in the form of cylinders or discs.
  • Grammaphone, Victrola
Apt
Appropriate or suitable circumstances. Suitable, convenient
Apt
  • "Dempsey's word is too apt I have never heard these things called anything but dumpsters"(Eighner).
  • Unusually intelligent
  • adj.
  • inclined, disposed

Apt
  • "Dempsey's word is too apt. I have never heard these called anything but Dumpsters" (Eighner).
  • Inclined, prone
  • Adjective
  • Synonyms: Applicable, appropriate
Votive
Offered or consecrated in a fulfillment or vow. Sacred Object, sacrifice
votive
  • "Rather, the function of the peri-toilet area is to house the ashtrays in which servers and dishwashers leave their cigarettes burining at all times, like votive(underlined) candles, so they don't have to waste time lighting up again when they dash back here for a puff"(Ehrenreich 157).
  • (adj.) offered, given, dedicated
votive
  • "Rather, the function of the peri-toilet area is to hous the ashtrays in which servers and dishwashers leave their cigarettes burning at all times, like votive candles"(Ehrenreich 157).
  • dedicated in fulfillment of a vow
  • adjective
  • no synonyms
votive
"...servers and dishwashers leave their cigarettes burning at all times, like votive candles" (Ehrenreich 157).

(adj.) offered, given, dedicated, etc., in accordance with a vow

synonyms: pledged, committed, dedicated
votive
  • An object offered in this way, such as a candle used as a vigil light
  • "...like votive candles, so they don't have to waist time lighting up again when they dash nack here for a puff." (Ehrenreich 156)
  • noun
  • dedicated, committed
Winos
  • These are drug addicts and winos, mostly the latter because the amount of cash is so small.
  • a person who is addicted to wine, especially a derelict
  • (n).
  • Alcoholic, Inebriate